How to Use Martial Arts to Break Into Movie Stunt Work

How to Use Martial Arts to Break Into Movie Stunt Work

As the theme song to the 1978 Burt Reynolds movie Hooper noted, “There ain’t nothing like the life of a Hollywood stuntman.” A lot of martial artists take those words to heart.

There’s an army of skilled — and not-so-skilled — practitioners of karate, taekwondo, kung fu and other martial arts trying to break into the motion-picture industry by making use of their ability to kick and punch, but how realistic is this? What do martial artists interested in stunt work need to know?

Judo Gene LeBell

Stunt pro and judo legend Gene LeBell. (photo by Rick Hustead)

“Learn to wait tables, clean bathrooms and walk the neighbor’s dog,” offered “Judo” Gene LeBell, one of only two people (the other is Jackie Chan) to be inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame and the Hollywood Stuntmen’s Hall of Fame. LeBell doesn’t mince words about the difficulties of doing fights and falls in films. He says with all the would-be stunt people out there, breaking into the field can be next to impossible.

“When I started in the business, there were about 40 stuntmen in Hollywood,” Gene LeBell said. “Now there’s over 10,000. I highly recommend getting a second job with a future and a retirement.”

But he adds that if you possess exceptional athletic ability and a burning desire to work in stunts no matter how difficult the path, you just might pull it off.

Female Perspective

Jessie Graff is a prime example of Gene LeBell’s guarded optimism. A skilled gymnast and track athlete, she knew from the time she was in college that she wanted to get into stunts. “It takes a lot of effort, but for me, it never felt like work because I loved it,” she said.

Graff began training in martial arts at the same time she moved to Hollywood to break into the stunt biz. She signed up at various gyms to learn anything that might help her, including taekwondo, northern eagle-claw kung fu and boxing. She says having a diverse martial arts background is essential because you could be called on to do virtually anything in a film fight.

Cheryl Wheeler

Cheryl Wheeler-Sanders competed in kickboxing under the name Cheryl Wheeler. (courtesy of CWS)

Former kickboxing champ and stunt pro Cheryl Wheeler-Sanders believes martial arts provide perhaps the best background for movie work. “Anything that’s an intense physical sport like gymnastics is good, but I think martial arts, with its emphasis on physical and mental toughness, lends itself in the best way,” she said.

Although she doesn’t believe the particular martial art you practice makes a great difference, she said you should be able to execute flashy moves like high kicks. She noted, however, that being able to perform such techniques in class or at a tournament doesn’t necessarily mean you can translate your skills to the screen.

Jessie Graff agreed. You often have to perform for the camera in ways that are the opposite of how you’d execute techniques in self-defense, she said. “In a real fight, you try to hide your motions and not telegraph them, but on camera, you’re trying to tell a story the audience can follow, so you specifically exaggerate your movements. For example, you’re taught to throw a hook punch as a short, tight technique. But on camera, you’d make it a very wide punch for everyone to see.”

Cheryl Wheeler-Sanders added that stunt performers must always be aware of the camera placement when doing action scenes. That enables them to keep their face hidden so the audience won’t know the star isn’t doing the fighting.

Reality Check

So if you have the “cinema fu” skills and heed all the advice listed above, will you have a decent shot at earning a living from stunts? Not necessarily, Gene LeBell said. “I know great martial arts champions who only occasionally get stunt work because they don’t have any other skills.

“Martial arts is one of just many skills you need if you want to make it in this business. Don’t think about getting into stunt work unless you can drive cars — and by that I mean turn them over safely — as well as drive motorcycles; do rappelling, scuba diving and high falls; deal with fire; and a bunch of other stuff.”

Klingon

Gene LeBell in Klingon makeup for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. (photo courtesy of Gene LeBell)

While that may sound daunting, it’s not impossible to pick up skills along the way, Cheryl Wheeler-Sanders said. She entered the stunt world almost by accident when she got a role in a film and the stunt people, impressed with her martial arts ability, encouraged her to pursue their line of work.

“I shouldn’t say this, but when I started out, we’d rent cars and take them out to …

The post How to Use Martial Arts to Break Into Movie Stunt Work appeared first on Black Belt Magazine.

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